Creswell Heights Joint Water Authority

Public Water Supply ID# 5040063

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report for 2015

 

Este informe contiene informacion muy importante sobre su agua de beber.Traduzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien. (This report contains very important information about your drinking water. Translate it, or speak to someone who understands it.)

 

This report is designed to inform you about the quality of water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a dependable supply of drinking water that meets all federal and state requirements.  Our water comes from four (4) groundwater wells.

 

Educational Information:

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.  Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  • Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
  • Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
  • Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can, also, come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
  • Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

 

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA and DEP prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.  FDA and DEP regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

 

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

 

A Source Water Assessment of our Sources(s) was completed in 2003 by the PA Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP).  The Assessment found that our sources are potentially most susceptible to contamination from power plants, railroads, river transportation, and roadway.  Overall, our sources have high risk of significant contamination.  Summary reports of the Assessment are available by writing to Creswell Heights Joint Authority, PO Box 301, South Heights, PA 15081 and will be available on the PADEP website at www.dep.state.pa.us/dep/deputate/watermgt/wc/subjects/SrceProt/SourceAssessment/default.htm Complete reports were distributed to municipalities, water supplier, local planning agencies and PADEP offices.  Copies of the complete report are available for review at the PADEP Pittsburgh Regional Office, Records Management Unit at (412) 442-4000.

 

In 2013 CHJA completed a Source Water Protection Plan. For more information, contact the office (724) 375-1303 or info@creswellwater.net.

 

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

 

Creswell Heights Joint Water Authority routinely monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The following table shows what we detected in our water during the period of January 1st to December 31st, 2015.  It's important to remember that the presence of these constituents does not necessarily pose a health risk. In the following tables, you will find many terms and abbreviations you may not be familiar with.  To help you better understand these terms we have provided the following:

 

Definitions and Abbreviations:

 

ppm=Parts per million or milligrams per Liter (mg/L). One part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.

ppb=Parts per billion or micrograms per Liter (µg/L).  One part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.

 

Action Level the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. 

 

Maximum Contaminant Level - The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

 

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal  - The “Goal” (MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

 

 

 

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) –The highest level of disinfectant allowed in drinking water.  There is

convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

 

 

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) – The level of drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

 

Minimum Residual Disinfectant Level (MinRDL) – The minimum level of residual disinfectant required at the entry point to the distribution system.

TEST RESULTS

Contaminant

Date Sampled

Units

Violation

Level

Detected

Range

MCLG

MCL

Likely Source of Contamination

Haloacetic Acids

2-4-15

ppb

No

21.0

15.4-21.0

0

60

By-product of drinking water chlorination

Copper

April-June 2014

ppm

Yes

(b)

1.54

0.346-1.77

1.3

AL-1.3

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives

Distribution

Chlorine

15

Samples monthly

ppm

No

0.82 (c)

0.22-1.12

MRDLG=4

MRDL=4

Additive to control microbes

Trihalomethanes

2-4-15

9-1-15

ppb

No

46.0

19.0-46.0

0

80

By-product of drinking water chlorination

Barium

Sept 2015

ppm

No

0.0237

(a)

2

2

Discharge of drilling wastes, metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits

Nitrate

Sept 2015

ppm

No

.35

(a)

10

10

Run off from fertilizer use, leaching from septic tanks, sewage, erosion of natural deposits

 

a.)  Only one sample required.  All samples were taken on the dates shown.  The results are from the latest samples required by regulations.

b.)  10 of 30 samples were at or over the action level.  We are undergoing an evaluation of the system in order to determine what actions we will take to return to compliance.  Copper is an essential nutrient, but some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over a relatively short amount of time could experience gastrointestinal distress. Some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over many years could suffer liver or kidney damage.  People with Wilson’s Disease should consult their personal doctor.

What can you do to reduce exposure to copper in drinking water?  Run your water to flush out copper.  If water hasn’t been used for several hours, run water for 15-30 seconds or until it becomes cold or reaches a steady temperature before using it for drinking or cooking. 

c.)  Highest monthly average of sites sampled.

 

Entry Point Disinfectant

Contaminant

MinRDL

Lowest level detected

Range of Detections

Unit

Date Sampled

Violation

 

Likely Source of Contamination

Chlorine

0.65

0.65

0.65-1.06

ppm

8/22/15

No

Water additive used to control microbes

 

 

Lead Testing

In April and June of 2014 CHJA tested 30 homes for the presence of lead in their household plumbing, all 30 samples results were <0.005 or non-detected.  If present elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children.  Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing.  CHJA is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components.  When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking.  If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested.  Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

 

UNREGULATED CONTAMINANT MONITORING

 IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR DRINKING WATER:

Availability of Monitoring Data for Unregulated Contaminants for the Creswell Heights Joint Authority. Our water system has sampled for a series of unregulated contaminants.  Unregulated contaminants are those that don’t yet have a drinking water standard set by EPA. The purpose of monitoring for these contaminants is to help EPA decide whether the contaminants should have a standard.  As our customers, you have a right to know that this data is available.  If you are interested in examining the results, please contact us at the phone number listed below.   

 

 

UNREGULATED CONTAMINANTS

CONTAMINANT

Sample Dates

VIOLATION Y/N

AVERAGE LEVEL DETECTED (ppb)

RANGE DETECTED   (ppb)

QUARTERS OUT OF COMPLIANCE

SOURCE OF CONTAMINATION

Chromium (Total) Entry Point

2/24/15 10/15/15

NA

0.293

0.2-0.385

0

Naturally-occurring element; used in making steel and other alloys; chromium-3 or-6 forms are used for chrome plating, dyes and pigments, leather tanning, and wood preservation

Chromium (Total) Distribution

2/24/15 8/19/15

NA

0.402

0.30-0.504

0

Chromium (VI) Entry Point

3/30/15 8/19/15

NA

0.07

0-0.13

0

Naturally-occurring element; used in making steel and other alloys; chromium-3 or-6 forms are used for chrome plating, dyes and pigments, leather tanning, and wood preservation

Chromium (Vi) Distribution

3/30/15 8/19/15

NA

0.10

0-0.19

0

Molybdenum Entry Point

2/24/1 5 8/19/15

NA

1.73

1.65-1.80

0

Naturally-occurring element found in ores and present in plants, animals and bacteria; commonly used form molybdenum trioxide used as a chemical reagent

Molybdenum Distribution

2/24/15 8/19/15

NA

1.79

1.57-2

0

Strontium Entry Point

2/24/15 10/15/15

NA

267.5

264-271

0

Naturally-occurring element; historically, commercial use of strontium has been in the faceplate glass of cathode-ray tube televisions to block x-ray emissions

Strontium Distribution

2/24/15 8/19/15

NA

256

246-266

0

Vanadium Distribution

2/24/15 8/19/15

NA

0.307

0-0.613

0

Naturally-occurring elemental metal; used as vanadium pentoxide which is a chemical intermediate and a catalyst

Chlorate Entry Point

2/24/15 8/19/15

NA

115.2

39.30-191

0

Agricultural defoliant or desiccant; disinfection byproduct; and used in production of chlorine dioxide

Chlorate Distribution

2/24/15 8/19/15

NA

153.80

62.6-245.0

0

 

Violation

[CHJA did have a violation in 2015]

Our handheld chlorine analyzers were not standardized with primary standards per EPA Method 334. When it was discovered that the standards were not correct the correct standards were purchased and the Authority is currently in compliance.

 

Conclusion

We want our valued customers to be informed about their water utility.  If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings that are held on the third Monday of each month at 7:00 PM at the authority office located at North and Jordan Streets.  If you have any questions, please contact the CHJA office at (724) 375-1303 Monday through Friday 8:30AM - 4:30PM.

                                                                                                                                             

                                                                                                                                              Creswell Heights Joint Water Authority

                                                                                                                                              Daniel Losco, General Manager      

This report is mandated by the Department of Environmental Protection.